Streets of hate: Hezbollah flags fly at pro-Palestinian march

Naqba march

PRO-PALESTINIAN protestors compared Israel to Hitler, waved Hezbollah flags and were joined by one of Australia’s most infamous neo-Nazis when they marked Al-Naqba Day on Tuesday night.

Less than 200 people turned out for the protest in the centre of Sydney; however, they forced NSW Police to stop traffic as they marched along George, Market, Pitt and King streets.

Al-Naqba Day, meaning “the catastrophe”, is the Arabic term referring to the creation of the State of Israel.

A female spokesperson at the rally quoted Hitler when she alleged that Israel is spreading lies about the Palestinians.

“Hitler said that the great masses of the people will more easily fall victims to a big lie than to a small one and that is what Israel is doing.”

One of the organisers, Patrick Langosch, said she was right.

“I think that Israel does tell a big lie and there is an international campaign hiding the Naqba,” Langosch said.

He rejected the assertion that it was insensitive to compare the systematic massacre of six million Jews during the Holocaust to the plight of Palestinians.

“I think it’s insensitive to try and diminish the suffering of the Palestinians.

“Comparison of the treatment of the Jews in Germany is not dissimilar to those in Gaza today.”

Langosch also said he didn’t have any problem with people waving Hezbollah flags, despite the fact it is considered a terrorist organisation by the Australian Government.

“Hezbollah is a resistance organisation in southern Lebanon and the Australian government might consider them to be terrorists, but actually a lot of people around the Middle East would consider them freedom fighters,” Langosch said.

“If people want to support the struggle in southern Lebanon, then I welcome them at the demonstration as long as they support the demands of the demonstration.”

However, he seemed to sing from a different tune when it came to one of Australia’s most infamous neo-Nazis, Ross “The Skull” May, who marched with the protest.

“Ross May was not there as part of our demonstration.

“He was informed that he was not part of the demonstration and he was not welcome … because he is a known neo-Nazi.”

Ruby Jacenko, a 22-year-old who was at the rally to show her support for Israel and reject claims by the marchers, said she didn’t feel safe.

“I had two older men go out of their way to intimidate me so I stayed nice and close to the police,” Jacenko said.

JOSHUA LEVI

The pro-Palestinian procession that marched through Sydney’s streets on Tuesday night.